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The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator

The great-grandfather of modern vacuum cleaners worked on gasoline and moved with the help of horses. And the first electric hair dryer was so “hot” that it easily became a cause of hair ignition. Thank God progress does not stand still. And we no longer have to risk our lives this way, reaping the fruits of science.

The evolution of technology: what the first car, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator looked like |  Brain berries

Car
The first car was an ordinary cart with a built-in steam engine. Bulky, clumsy, with huge rear wheels and a fireman, tirelessly throwing firewood into the boiler.

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 2 |  Brain berries

Vacuum cleaner
The prototype of vacuum cleaners, by modern standards, was gigantic and transported in a horse-drawn cart. Of course, this miracle of technology did not fit indoors. A vacuum cleaner was parked outside the house. And already on the spot they cleaned the carpets. The horses were horrified by the sounds of a roaring monster. So the cleaning in the apartment was that performance.
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The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 3 |  Brain berries

Hairdryer
As the story goes, women dried their beautiful curls first with an open fire or stove, then with a vacuum cleaner and finally with a hair dryer in 1925. Which of these methods is the safest, one can only guess. Why? The first electric hair dryer worked on liquid fuel and was heated to decent temperatures. Burning your hair while drying was easy.

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 4 |  Brain berries

Refrigerator The
great-grandfather of refrigerators was impressive in size and rather resembled a massive cabinet. At the same time, the chamber where the products were stored was very modest in size. Only very wealthy people could acquire know-how.

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 5 |  Brain berries

Fire extinguisher
In the era of home fireplaces and candles, fire extinguishers were very relevant. Especially for ladies in crinolines that are flammable from just one spark. The first fire extinguishers looked like grenades with a check. They were filled with infernal liquid, which causes toxic poisoning in people. When it became clear that fire extinguishers were possibly more dangerous than the fire itself, the contents of the bottle were replaced with ordinary saline.

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 6 |  Brain berries

Apple Computer
It’s hard to imagine that the predecessor of modern, ultra-thin tablets and smartphones was so cumbersome. By today’s standards, Apple 1 had a monstrously tiny memory – only 8 kilobytes. In order to “turn on” the computer, it was necessary to enter a multi-kilometer program code. On average, users took this action for at least 30 minutes.

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 7 |  Brain berries

The
Motorola DynaTAC 8000X cell phone weighed a kilogram and could store up to 30 phone numbers. Charging was only enough for an hour. How do you like this super stylish design?

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 8 |  Brain berries

Bicycle
The forerunner of all modern bicycles was the so-called penny farthing. Fancy, with a huge front and very small rear wheel. Due to its not very safe design and high landing, he often became the cause of serious injuries. Surprisingly, penny farthing turned out to be quite suitable for long trips. In 1884, American Thomas Stevens traveled around the world on it. The whole journey took him a little over two years.

The evolution of technology: what the first car looked like, a vacuum cleaner, a refrigerator # 9 |  Brain berries

Electric kettle
Electric kettles, which appeared at the end of the 19th century, were equipped with heating devices, located separately from the container with liquid. For this reason, the water in the kettle heated very slowly. Engineers managed to solve this problem only after almost half a century.

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